Sunday, March 22, 2015

Easter Plus!!


Do you know my young friend, Gina, who writes the wonderful blog, "Random thoughts from an incoherent mind"?  I absolutely adore her and her blog.  If you have not read it, you can follow the link here.  You will love her blog and how she can decorate a mantel!! When I was ready to write this Easter post, I truly had an incoherent mind with many random thoughts!




As I was pulling out china to plan my table, I decided that I would like to use my Bordallo Pinheiro
"Cabbage" chargers that I have been slowly collecting.  Here is where the random thoughts began...

When I left home for college, I entered a school that had previously been an all girls' school.  It started admitting boys who boarded the quarter (yep, we had quarters, then, instead of semesters!), before I arrived.

Traditions ran strong there and each class had a theme.  I was in the "Royal" class and we had a sister class two years ahead us who were called the "Irish" class.  Together, we formed the "Royal Irish" group. The other sister classes were the Elephants and the Thunderbirds, who became the "Thunderphants".  These were the four designations and each freshman class fell into one of them and remained there, until graduation. My sister-in-law, who entered the school two years after I did,  was part of the next Irish class - and so it went.

Back to my table - guess which colors our "Royal Irish" classes claimed!  Purple (Royal) and green (Irish).  So, I started thinking about my classmates and wondering if they might enjoy seeing a green and purple Easter tablescape.  Random enough, so far???



After selecting these colors, I decided not to use too many typical Easter accessories, because I have a very sick grandson who will enter the hospital tomorrow, the day after I am typing this post.  I am not sure what my Easter will be like this year and did not feel much like bunnies and chicks running all over my table. I am writing this a bit early, as I am headed out of town tomorrow to keep the other two grandchildren, while my daughter is with Carson at the hospital.





The wonderful reticulated salad plates on top pulled all of the colors together.  I found them for a fantastic price at Maryland China online.

The other random mind issue was that I started thinking about the family in which I grew-up and all of the Easters that we shared.  I dug out a few of old photos and thought I would share them with you.



Yours truly with my Easter basket.  I look very proud!



My dad, my sister and me



My dad and my brother.  I guess my mom was taking the photos!!

I remember how those times were, especially, happy.  The Easter bunny came and we had new clothes to wear to church.  One year, my mother ordered a fancy yellow dress for me from Rich's department store in Atlanta.  I thought I was a princess, indeed.  It came with a matching parasol - can you imagine?? Sadly, I have no photo of that - so wish that I did!! I'll bet most of you have similar good memories of past Easter mornings.

I guess this random mind had better get back to business!!



In addition to the Bordallo charger and the Thun salad plates, I used a purple JC Penney "Chateau" dinner plate.



Sferra lilac "Dusty" napkins and Laurie Gates purple flatware from Horchow were, also, part of the place setting.



I resisted the urge to use two different Fostoria goblets this time, even though I do own purple ones. The purple one here was a very inexpensive purchase from Old Time Pottery. but the topaz one is Fostoria.  It is stem #5099 with the Versailles (#278) etching.



Oh, how pretty, pretty this stemware is, but I could be prejudiced, since I have a definite obsession with Fostoria.  If you are not aware of this, you can read all about this obsession here.

I did include one bunny in the post and I do want to wish all of you who celebrate Easter a very happy and, especially, a very healthy one!




Diane


P. S. I thought you some of you might remember my grandson and the guest tablescape that he did for Confessions of the Obsessed a few years ago - see it here. Get well soon, dear boy - Nana loves you!!





Sharing at:

Between Naps on the Porch for Tablescape Thursday

Thursday, March 19, 2015

Georgia Day 2015


Some of you might remember the post that I did last year in celebration of Georgia Day.  If you missed it, you can see the table that I set with my friend Susie's beautiful Georgia Plates here.  This year on February 21st, I traveled to Milledgeville, Georgia to celebrate with my Daughters of the American Revolution chapter. I am a little late in posting this, but I could not resist sharing it with you, anyway.

The plate shown above was one of the Georgia Plates used at the head table for our celebration this year.  It shows James Oglethorpe, who founded the Georgia colony.



Milledgeville is a beautiful and historic city.  It was the state capital of Georgia from 1804 to 1868.  This photo is of the Old Capitol Building on the campus of Georgia Military College.  Actually, the first building was damaged by fire in 1941 and rebuilt to look like the original.



Here is photograph of the Old Governor's Mansion, which is now part of Georgia College and State University.  It is worth a trip to Milledgeville just to see this Greek Revival building and tour the the interior, especially the gorgeous dome ceiling.  It is a treasure!



Another historic building in Milledgeville is St. Stephens Episcopal Church. It was incorporated in 1841 and was damaged, during Sherman's occupation of Milledgeville.  Syrup was poured down the organ pipes. In addition, the roof and stained glass windows were damaged, when a nearby magazine and arsenal were blown-up by the northern soldiers, as they left to continue their "March to the Sea".  However, Milledgeville was spared from having been burned!! So for that, we are thankful!




The reason that I included St. Stephens is that our Georgia Day brunch was held in the modern addition of the old church.



As I mentioned previously, the head table was set with the gorgeous pink Georgia Plates (they, also, are produced in blue).  The other tables were set with Churchill "Blue Willow" plates, which were  provided by my dear daughter who is, also, a member of this chapter.  The favors on the plates were  cookies cut out in the shape of Georgia and decorated beautifully.  All of these were made by one member.  What a nice surprise!  The food for brunch was provided by other N.S.D.A.R. members and delicious. My contributions were cheddar and bacon muffins.  I forgot to take photos, though.



We had two state officers who were able to join us.  This is one of them bringing greetings from the other officers who could not attend, since they were with other chapters for Georgia Day celebrations.




Even though, this was not an official meeting, our lovely Regent, Amelia, handled the business of the day.



We had an amazing speaker who is retired from the military and a history professor at Georgia Military College. As a history major in college, I love a speaker who makes history interesting and fun.  He, definitely, fell into that category.



We had a few surprise visitors from the past...



Wow, it that Daniel Boone with a coonskin hat?  No, it was just a member of the John Milledge chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution who joined us for the day.



We had three new members to join our chapter the day of our celebration.  One of them, I have known for so many years, but I had not seen her for quite a while. Our daughters used to dance together and we had fun reminiscing about happy times.  Her mother was, also, a member here and was a dear friend of mine, before we lost her a few years ago.



Here is the display honoring our chapter, which is named for Nancy Morgan Hart.  For those of you who are not familiar with Georgia history, Nancy Hart is a very famous figure from the American Revolution. You can read about this brave woman here. I am proud to be a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution and, especially, this chapter named for such an incredible woman.



This young lady on the right was present to represent the C.A.R. or Children of the American Revolution.  The Milledgeville chapter is named for Sukey Hart, who was one of Nancy Hart's children.

What a wonderful day I had at this lovely event! I lived in Milledgeville for 14 years and have many friends there still.  It was made more enjoyable by the fact that my daughter and I could spend time together.  All in all, it was a great day - happy birthday, Georgia!!


Diane










Friday, March 13, 2015

#EatDrinkBeCherry


Can you guess what time it is in my city???? If you have read my blog previously, you already know that I live in a city of cherry blossoms this time of the year!



It is time for the annual International Cherry Blossom Festival! It is the time of the year that everything turns pink here - fountains, clothing, food and even dogs.  Yes, we have pink poodles at our party! This year, the official hashtag is #EatDrinkBeCherry, which is where I got the name for  this post.



Every year, I set a table to honor the festival.  This year, I used Diamond China "Cherry Blossom" salad plates with J.C. Penney "Coventry" larger, pink salad plates and white Mikasa "Yardley" dinner plates.



The glasses that I chose to use are Cambridge etched "Diane" water goblets and Bavarian clear red balloon goblets.

If you enjoy a little wine or, especially, ale, you definitely want visit the festival this year.  One of the newest events is a Beers and Brats Biergarten Celebration.  This one sounds like fun...



Since I have been blogging and have been reporting on the Cherry Blossom Festival each year, I have become obsessed (of course - are you surprised?) with pink tableware.  I finally had to start a "Pink" board on Pinterest, since I was pinning so many pink items.  These wonderful salt and pepper shakers were found on eBay a few years ago.  They are Depression glass pieces in the pink "Block Optic" pattern by Hocking Glass (now, Anchor Hocking), which were produced from 1929 - 1933.



We have a pink pancake breakfast, during the festival, so I thought I would add a little pink treat to my table - pink popcorn.  All of it did not turn pink, so I think I might have to work on recipe a bit.  For you who regularly read by blog, you know cooking is not my greatest talent, but I love reading all of your recipes and seeing your yummy food!



The cherry blossoms on these plates are very pretty, but in no way compare to the gorgeous pastel blooms showing up all over the city in March every year. I live two minutes away from one of the largest collections of the trees, which are on a piece of land called the "Fickling Farm". William Fickling started the festival. He fell in love with the Yoshino cherry trees in 1952! The trees on his family's farm put on a magnificent show each spring and I get to pass by everyday on the way to do errands.  What a gift!



Well, enough of my bragging, about our Pinkest Party on Earth!  You really should visit for yourself.  If you would like to know more about the festival and the activities, you can find all of the information here. You should visit the website, if you cannot make it to the events, just to see how much fun we have each March.  However, there is nothing like visiting, when all 300,000  trees are in full bloom. Plan a visit to Macon and tell them Diane sent you!!!


Diane



The Fickling Farm cherry trees!






Sharing at:

How Sweet the Sound for Pink Saturday

Between Naps on the Porch for Tablescape Thursday






Monday, March 2, 2015

The Emerald Isle!


Once, again, it is time to join together with our Irish friends to honor St. Patrick! I have chosen to celebrate by setting a a table in the Irish flag colors.



The Irish flag was introduced by Thomas Francis Meagher in 1848. The green represents the Irish people, most of whom are Catholic. The orange color represents the British supporters of William of Orange who settled in Northern Ireland in the 17th century most of whom are Protestant. The white in the center represents the peace between the two groups. Thomas Meagher on the meaning of the Irish flag said, "The white in the center signifies a lasting truce between the Orange and the Green; and I trust that beneath its folds the hands of the Irish Protestant and the Irish Catholic may be clasped in heroic brotherhood." Thanks to the Enchanted Learning website for this information.



When I think of Ireland, I think of Shamrocks, beautiful crystal and the shades of green. This lovely old Belleek "Shamrock" sugar and creamer, definitely, reminds me of my visit to the Emerald Isle a few years ago.



Green and gold were my choices for setting the table this year, along with touches of orange.



Lots of Irish crystal - Waterford and Galway. Oh, how I love the way it sparkles!!!




The water glass with the gold rim is "Andover" by Fostoria and is an American piece.   Don't you love the Irish Leprechaun with the "Lucky Irish" shamrock.  He is one of my favorite pieces to use this time of the year.




Another favorite piece is this Bordallo Pinheiro teapot in the "St. Patrick" pattern. I found this at Goodwill.  Can you imagine anyone giving this away???




The remainder of the place setting consists of "Donatello" gold flatware by Ricci, Syracuse "Wayne" gold encrusted salad plates, cups and saucers and Mikasa "Ming Green" dinner plates.  I am hoping using all of the gold will help in my quest to find the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow!!!



Kathleen of Cuisine Kathleen challenges bloggers to bring out the green and celebrate St. Patrick's Day with her.  This year we will link up and enjoy seeing all of the beautiful tables in the Blog Crawl. I cannot wait - it is so much fun each year.


I hope all of you enjoy your St. Patrick's Day, whether or not you are Irish.  I have to confess each year that I do have Irish roots, but I am afraid they are Orange and not Green!  I am just happy that the Irish flag honors both.  I am leaving you with a few more photos from my table. I hope you all find your pot of gold!!!




Diane










Sharing at:

Between Naps on the Porch for Tablescape Thursday 

Cuisine Kathleen for the St. Patrick's Day Blog Crawl